Ms Hannah Barrowman

PhD Student
Frank Fenner Building (141)
 +61 2 612 58133

Profile

Qualifications

BSc (Hons) MSc (Hons)

Biography

Hannah graduated from The University of Auckland, New Zealand with a Bachelor of Science degree in Geography and Environmental Science. She was awarded First Class Honours and the Science Faculty Masters Award to pursue a Master of Science degree at The University of Auckland, specialising in Geography. Upon obtaining First Class Honours in her Master of Science degree, Hannah has subsequently gone on to obtain an Australian Postgraduate Award (APA) and is now undertaking a PhD with the Fenner School of Environment and Society.

Under the supervision of Dr. Jamie Pittock (ANU), Professor Karen Edyvane (CDU) and Dr James Butler (CSIRO), Hannah’s PhD project focuses on climate change community-based adaptation (CBA) in Indonesia and Timor-Leste, exploring the influence of novel governance features on CBA outcomes. This project is being carried out in collaboration with The Universidade Nacional Timor Lorosa’e in Timor-Leste and Universitas Mataram (UNRAM) in Indonesia.

Research

Research interests

Thesis title

Emerging governance approaches for successful community-based adaptation in Timor-Leste and Indonesia: what works and why?

Thesis description

Community-based adaptation (CBA) to climate change is a community-led process, based on communities’ priorities, needs, knowledge systems and capacities. The aim of CBA is to empower local people to prepare for and cope with the impacts of climate change (Reid et al., 2009). This is carried out through a process of building the capacity of local community members to make decisions that reduce risk to livelihoods and assets, and building in an ability to cope with constant change. This process is complicated, however, due to the uncertainties in climate change projections and impacts (Ranger and Garbet-Shiles, 2012), and the multi-stakeholder and cross-sectoral nature of adaptation (Conway and Mustelin, 2014). CBA is therefore not without its challenges. Through this PhD project, I look at the role of novel and innovative governance features in assisting stakeholder groups to address some of the challenges associated with bottom-up initiatives in climate change adaptation.

Updated:  20 November 2017/Responsible Officer:  Director Fenner School/Page Contact:  Webmaster Fenner School